All posts filed under: entrepreneurship

It’s “the heart” that will gain respect.

Consider a dichotomy of “the heart” versus “financial success”. Compare the situation between a vet, and a super successful banker. The latter is at least 20X richer than the former. Unless this banker is passionate about making the world a better place via his occupation, it is likely that the vet will gain more genuine respect. Next, consider the situation between the vet and a volunteer in a disaster-striken region. Even though the vet is 20X richer than the unpaid volunteer, it is likely that both will gain equal respect because they believe strongly in about what they do. It truly is the heart that will gain respect, wherever you go. So, the next question we should ask ourselves is, “How do we do things that magnify hearts”? – This is a question of business model already. I don’t believe creative folks should be poor if they want to further their vision and craft. I really don’t. But I do believe that success requires the permission of each and every individual.

Politics, business and…letting go.

Quick post before I start my day. Recently, I’d been talking to my fellow entrepreneur friends on the topic of “business and politics”. This is one topic that intrigues me, because I’m sincerely interested in politics enough to comment on it publicly. Some of the business-folks/ previous or current NCMP I follow include: Calvin Cheng, Patrick Liew, Raymond Ng, Shiao-yin Kuik, Goh Yong Wei (lol). I also read D’Niel’s posts but he’s not based in Singapore. I also happen to love reading Olli Muurainen’s posts on Finnish economy. He’s quite sarcastic sometimes, which becomes super funny! 🙂 But I really like him as a person because I think he’s very wise, kind, super unpretentious and humble. Also, he has a genuine heart for Finland. I once asked him in person, “Why don’t you join politics in Finland? You’re so passionate about it and I’m sure you’d be super good for the country.” And he said, “Because I still want to give full undivided attention to my business! Maybe I’d join when I’m older.” I deviate. Anyway, after talking …

Finland can be for the ambitious: The 3 things I’d learnt from Peter Vesterbacka.

Today I will write briefly about the 3 things I’d learnt from my interview here with Peter Vesterbacka. Yeow and I were invited to Innovfest 2016 as part of the media, and Peter was one of the featured speakers. That’s how we got to interview him. I always reflect on nuggets of wisdom from interviewees whom I find interesting, and because I’m a bit slow, I would only write down learnings randomly whenever stuffs are internalised. But what surprised even myself was that I really liked Peter as a person. You see, given his huge success with Rovio and Angry Birds, he’s actually still very, very humble and kind, and I think he spent more than 5 hours with the NUS enterprise youngsters on Day 1 of Innovfest. He doesn’t have to, but he did. He just spent close to one afternoon talking to the student ambassadors on his own will. I don’t see other speakers doing that. So, I interpret that as his heart for young prospective entrepreneurs and the global entrepreneurship eco-system. – Nugget of Wisdom #1: …

Tip for all entrepreneurs: Always sign a contract before starting any paid project.

Hmm quick post before I end my day. Recently I had been working with quite some of my lawyer friends (due to common grassroot projects), and I felt that my knowledge of law increased by quite a bit. So today I want to write briefly about the one very important thing I’d learnt from lawyers and other more experienced entrepreneurs. Hope this post benefits entrepreneurs who are just starting out/ freelancers/ one-off-art-project doers. It is this: Whenever a paid project is involved, always sign a contract. That is to say, whenever money is involved, always have things in black and white. Sometimes, us entrepreneurs are too trusting, so we decide to trust just verbal promises instead of black and white documentations. – Do this no matter how much you think you trust the person who is paying you. Do this no matter how shiny/ trustworthy/ likeable the client seems to be. – Because, when shit hits the fan, shit hits the fan. I’m speaking from personal experience. This contract must include: Exactly what is the project on, and what is …