Month: May 2016

Will pain ever go away?

Let me tell you–Pain will not completely go away, for sure. From time to time a small part of pain will come back. And you’d cry. But you’d feel better after crying. I just finished writing one particular article on Singapore’s divorce for Huffe, and the traumatic process of divorce is probably the same as the traumatic process when you are coping with a big crisis in your life. The pain will come back from time to time. It will make you cry when you least expect it. Then you’d think, “Why did they have to screw up something as important as this for you? Your future is just gone, gone–and whatever is gone will never come back again.” With that amount of effort you put in, why did they have to destroy it for you? Why did they have to be so merciless in the destruction? Callous, even. As though what you are striving to protect is worth shit. I have a solution for you, my friend. The solution is to move on.  It’s not exactly that you have …

My affinity with wine lovers + a book review on “White or Red, it’s all in your head”.

Happy Monday! 🙂 Today I am going to pen down some of my reflections on my affinity with wine lovers, and also a book review on Chris Milliken’s “White or red, it’s all in your head”. It’s a really cool book! Chris’s the founder of Peng Wine, and you can read one of his interviews here. I was really happy to finally try Peng Wine at The Halia yesterday. 😀 Peng Wine is lovingly and proudly made-in-Chile. — Brief context: My relationship with wine. I’d always have some sort of affinity with people who love wine. When I was doing my year long student-exchange in Japan, I worked at a club in Roppongi. No idea if it is legal or not, but I did pay 10% income taxes LOL. So that was my first experience with wine–prior to that I’d never opened a bottle of wine before. There, I met some customers who really loved wine, and I started drinking myself because they treated me. HAHA. I learnt how to open wine bottles and choose the right wine …

Politics, business and…letting go.

Quick post before I start my day. Recently, I’d been talking to my fellow entrepreneur friends on the topic of “business and politics”. This is one topic that intrigues me, because I’m sincerely interested in politics enough to comment on it publicly. Some of the business-folks/ previous or current NCMP I follow include: Calvin Cheng, Patrick Liew, Raymond Ng, Shiao-yin Kuik, Goh Yong Wei (lol). I also read D’Niel’s posts but he’s not based in Singapore. I also happen to love reading Olli Muurainen’s posts on Finnish economy. He’s quite sarcastic sometimes, which becomes super funny! 🙂 But I really like him as a person because I think he’s very wise, kind, super unpretentious and humble. Also, he has a genuine heart for Finland. I once asked him in person, “Why don’t you join politics in Finland? You’re so passionate about it and I’m sure you’d be super good for the country.” And he said, “Because I still want to give full undivided attention to my business! Maybe I’d join when I’m older.” I deviate. Anyway, after talking …

Finland can be for the ambitious: The 3 things I’d learnt from Peter Vesterbacka.

Today I will write briefly about the 3 things I’d learnt from my interview here with Peter Vesterbacka. Yeow and I were invited to Innovfest 2016 as part of the media, and Peter was one of the featured speakers. That’s how we got to interview him. I always reflect on nuggets of wisdom from interviewees whom I find interesting, and because I’m a bit slow, I would only write down learnings randomly whenever stuffs are internalised. But what surprised even myself was that I really liked Peter as a person. You see, given his huge success with Rovio and Angry Birds, he’s actually still very, very humble and kind, and I think he spent more than 5 hours with the NUS enterprise youngsters on Day 1 of Innovfest. He doesn’t have to, but he did. He just spent close to one afternoon talking to the student ambassadors on his own will. I don’t see other speakers doing that. So, I interpret that as his heart for young prospective entrepreneurs and the global entrepreneurship eco-system. – Nugget of Wisdom #1: …

Why SEO is making national stereotypes stronger.

Quick post before I go out. The thing about search engine optimisation (SEO) is this. If you are a foreigner, and want to be associated with a country X, you have to keep making stereotypes about that particular country. It’s as simple as that. And you have to spam the country’s keywords and commonly held stereotypes about that particular country. The more stereotypes you make about the country, the higher you rank on search engines. For instance, if I were a foreigner and want to get attention, I can always name my blog “Enlightened by Awesome Singapore” (e.g. http://www.enlightenedbyawesomesingapore.com) Sure, it’d rank high on search engines, and I might be able to please the Singaporean masses.”This is a good foreigner in Singapore!” Singaporeans might then think. And I’d spam some pillar posts on how Singapore is awesome by making stereotypes about local Singaporeans. Those posts are meant to be superficial, and have the function of SEO. And therefore, it’s paradoxical to claim to blog about anything “serious” AND still have a superficial bootlicking country blog-branding. But …

Sakura-themed weddings.

Have you ever found something you could do forever? I’d found it. Um, and it’s a weird sort of feeling. This post is going to be incoherent. Today I was thinking about Sakura-themed weddings, and the first thought that came to my mind were weddings at Kichijo-ji, one of my favorite places in Japan. When I was there in 2010, all I could think of is my ex-boyfriend, who’s Japanese. I only had/have two BFs in my whole life, lol. The nihonjin ex is super good looking, super rich, eloquent, charming, 185cm hehe and super subtle. So I remembered walking to the bridge and thinking of him, while I was looking at the sakuras. We broke up because of different foundations in communication + I was insecure when I was younger. This is how Kichijoji looks like, in full bloom. (Source) People change. Things fade, emotions fade, memories fade. Then memories die, and sometimes you can’t even remember who’s who, or what happened. I think however, beauty at that moment lives on, and on, and then you …